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View Full Version : Activating a used game.


mistygreywolf
11-12-2009, 10:39 AM
I purchased a Half-Life 2 at a salvation army thrift store and the sit e will not let me activate it. What is the deal. I sent a support help request around 48 hours ago and still have not received any help on the issue. I am not trying to be rude but, how long does it ussually take to get a response from support. Please! Anyone! How do I activate my used game? Thanks in advance for any help that anyone can give me on this issue. I apologize if there is a post on this topic somewhere else I do not have time to search through all the treads for an answer to my issue. I did do a search and could not find anything. Thanks for the help.

:confused::confused::confused:

Silicon Vampire
11-12-2009, 11:31 AM
Support takes 2 -5 days, depending on several factors.

Used games have already been registered to an account and the original owner would have to reset the key within certain guidelines.

Duplicate CD Key (https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=6823-QADN-7849)

CD Key Reset Process (https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=1673-IDGK-4694)

You should never by used games that require online activation and are bound to specific accounts.

mistygreywolf
11-12-2009, 11:49 AM
I guess I learned a lesson today. I appreciate the information. I just wounder though? Why would any company ever make a game that can not be shared. After all a lot of players buy there games after they have tried it out allowing them to try before you buy. I would not have purchased the game if I new that this was going to be the situation. Now knowing that Valve tries to control the market, I will not purchase another valve game again.
Remember when the playstation 2 first came out? They tried to do the same thing by making the game system so that any disc that was used in the system would be marked with a code allowing that disc to be used only in that system. This lasted about 2 minutes and as soon as the gamers realized this Playstation 2 took a huge market hit until they recalled these systems and stopped this practice. If I buy a game I may want to let a friend borrow it. THAT IS MY RIGHT AS A CUSTOMER. If the creater of the game does not want me to have the right to do this then I will not buy their games. THIS PRACTICE IS NOT GOOD BUSINESS PRACTICE IN THE LONG RUN. Heck Microsoft even figured that one out.
Thanks for your time.
:confused::mad:

Gomataka
11-12-2009, 12:41 PM
He have said you a way to reset the game ....

If you got the cd-key in the box you can reset the key as i can see by the link the moderator have give ;)...

Silicon Vampire
11-12-2009, 12:56 PM
He have said you a way to reset the game ....

If you got the cd-key in the box you can reset the key as i can see by the link the moderator have give ;)...

Not really. Read the links I supplied. He wil not be able to reset the key without valid proof of original purchase.

Silicon Vampire
11-12-2009, 12:58 PM
greywolf, "sharing" the game is a form of piracy that not much could be done about before Steam. This is why the policies are the way they are...

mistygreywolf
11-12-2009, 02:38 PM
greywolf, "sharing" the game is a form of piracy that not much could be done about before Steam. This is why the policies are the way they are...

OK sorry but letting someone borrow something I OWN IS not piracy. Let see. If someone buys a computer and wants to let another person borrow it I guess that is piracy too. Buying any product and letting someone borrow it is not piracy. I got me a new car the other day. WHAT THE HECK YOU MEAN I CAN"T LET ANY USE IT. GET REAL Silicon. You don't really believe what you just said do you? If so I feel sorry for your friends cause you ain't gonna let anyone play with your toys.

PIRACY IS THE ACT OF DELIBERATELY COPYING A OR SOFTWARE PROGRAM OR VIDEO OR MUSIC ETC. ETC.

If this is the future of gaming look out PC world. The industry is going to loss BILLIONS.

When you purchase merchandise it is yours to do with what you will. Calling letting someone borrow your game a form of piracy is just down right, well, Childish.

"I am the big bad PC COMPANY. Don't you dare share my stuff."

GET OVER IT CRY BABY CORPORATION.

If you do not want people sharing your product then, DON'T MAKE ANYTHING.

I can not believe there are people out there who think that controlling everything they can is the way things should be done.
And buy the way if you thing this is going do do something about piracy think again. This just gives the croaks out there more reason to want to Pirate. Any good hack can get around that kind of bull. And trust me. I will not be buying anything that is supported BY STEAM MADE BY VALVE ETC. ETC.
Just what the world needs another azz nine company who wants to rule the customers world. HI BILL GATES, DID YOU GET A NEW JOB?

Silicon Vampire
11-12-2009, 03:08 PM
You do not own any software unless you wrote it yourself.

The original purchaser bought a non-transferable license to play the game. You purchased everything but the license as it is in use by the original purchaser.

I should add that you still should contact support about this matter, mabye they will do something about it? I'm not Valve support at all, I'm just outlining the policies that are in place.

mistygreywolf
11-12-2009, 03:42 PM
Just because a game is used does not make it pirated and for anyone to say that it is is just ridiculous.

Do you still own every game that you ever purchased?

It is your right to resell, give away, share anything that you purchase anywhere regardless of what it is. Once the original product is sold to the public it becomes the owners and the owner is now the one who has the right to do with it what they wish. However this does not mean they can make copies to disperse but the right to share it with others.

So yes when I purchased the game it had the activation code on it and it now belongs to me.

I know what steams policy is but I do not agree with it.

I have contacted support and frankly there support kinda sucks. Why should I have to wait more than 48 hours for a response on support for any product I purchase software or other product. A company either cares for there customers who allow them to be in business in the first place or they do not. Bad customer support, in time, simply leads to the closed doors of that corporation.

I do appreciate your response to my situation. I am just not very happy with the treatment I have received from Valve and Steam, which is no treatment at all period.

:o:confused::eek::(:mad:

Silicon Vampire
11-12-2009, 04:07 PM
I never said your used game had anything to do with piracy. I said the license agreement is now enforcable through Steam.

Please, give them a little time. There are millions of people using Steam, you aren't the only one needing support.

mistygreywolf
11-12-2009, 04:26 PM
Thanks for the help Siicon. And nothing I am talking about relates to you and how considerate you have been for taking the time to respond.

This is all I am saying until I get a response from support.

Sorry but poor customer service is just that and this is poor customer service. No one should ever have to wait this long to get help from the supplier of a product.

What does this mean. There is know difference in selling a game or letting someone borrow a game you own. It is the owner of the games right to use the product they purchased the way they choose. Did you or did you not say this.

"greywolf, "sharing" the game is a form of piracy that not much could be done about before Steam. This is why the policies are the way they are..."

Again I am not trying to be rude I just do not agree with steams customer service policies is all. It makes for very poor business practices to make customers wait for support or to act in such a way as to assume that everyone is out to steal, "Pirate" your products so put a lock on your system as best as possible to stop people from playing your games with out buying them. Sometimes it is the trying the game that creates the buying and good customer service that is fast and reliable that keeps customers happy and buying and re-buying. This kind of treatment is what runs customers off.

Silicon Vampire
11-12-2009, 06:13 PM
You said sharing and that can mean only one thing when the terms of use are the way are. Read the EULA for nearly any game, they all read pretty much the same as Steam. There was just no way to enforce it before.

mistygreywolf
11-12-2009, 06:25 PM
Ok then all manufatures of games are crocked. LOL If I own it I will use it as I chose or I will not buy it. You can do and believe what you want. lol

TheMG
11-12-2009, 09:23 PM
If I own it I will use it as I chose or I will not buy it. You can do and believe what you want. lol

But the truth is you do not own the game. When you buy a game, all you buy is a license which gives you the legal right to play the game. As with any type of licensing agreement, the license limits what you can and can not do with the game.

Prior to online activation methods, game developers were unable to control or restrict sharing/reselling of hard copies of games.

However this has changed, and is a trend that is only going to become more and more common.

Why do they do it? Game developers wish to extract as much profit as they can from their work. When people share or resell copies of their games, they don't make any money off of that.

frymaster
11-12-2009, 10:16 PM
well there's 2 opposing points here:

1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernor_v._Autodesk,_Inc.

This says that even if the license details claim you're licensing the software rather than buying it, you still have the right to sell it on. This means valve can't sue the previous owner

2) the steam terms & conditions plainly state games can't be transferred once activated. and nothing in that court case above contradicts that - basically, it's not illegal to sell the game on, but valve don't have to assist you :)

so essentially, the person you have a beef with, legally, is the person you bought it from. you should be entitled to a refund from them as they've sold you something that doesn't work (second-hand or not, and regardless of any "caveat emptor" or similar notices)

mistygreywolf
11-13-2009, 12:50 AM
But the truth is you do not own the game. When you buy a game, all you buy is a license which gives you the legal right to play the game. As with any type of licensing agreement, the license limits what you can and can not do with the game.

Prior to online activation methods, game developers were unable to control or restrict sharing/reselling of hard copies of games.

However this has changed, and is a trend that is only going to become more and more common.

Why do they do it? Game developers wish to extract as much profit as they can from their work. When people share or resell copies of their games, they don't make any money off of that.

OK Sorry but again regardless of what they wish to do it may seem that it will become a more common thing but the rest of the Gamming retail world is a bit ticked off by this practice.

Yes the developers deserve to make as much money as they can but the minimle amount of monies lost from sharring or reselling a game does not even add up to 10% of the entire market. Realistically it is probaly more like 3 to 5% of the market.

Tape recorders have been out for over 50 years and the recording industry has tried to stop people from sharring the music they have purchased.

With any electronic technology the developer only owns the rights to the merchandise untill they sell it. No different than buying a car. The owner gets the rights to it. However game developers do retain the rights to the copy write of the product but even with their so called contracts a purchaser is only bound buy the law and not by the developer and law says it is mine and not theirs any longer.

I can not recreat it for any reson except my own use and any copies must go with it if I sell it. If my own used, meening I can use it how I choose, is to share it with a friend, just as say lending a music cd to a friend, then that is my right being that I am the owner. If I choose to stop using it and resell it then again it is my right and not theirs just as if I would sell say a used book.

It is digital content and the purchaser retains the rights to the media that they have purchased so long as they do not void any copywrite laws and sharing or reselling does not violate these laws.

So sorry I am not trying to be rude, but those of you who do not understand what steam and valve are doing to the industry I hope you can wake up ands see the reality of what they are doing.

Sorry so winded I just do not understand why any creative individual would be so uptight about what they did that they would go to such extreams to stop there fans, the customer from wanting to use there product and possably purchas their products in the future.

They just need to quit whining about it and accept that they are making a small fortune from what they are doing and let it go.

ParticleSt0rm
11-13-2009, 02:10 AM
"So sorry I am not trying to be rude, but those of you who do not understand what steam and valve are doing to the industry I hope you can wake up ands see the reality of what they are doing."

We know what is going on hence why we never buy games from thrift stores. As stated like on every other CD, DVD and cassette be it audio, video or game you are not permitted to share said media. This includes lending, hiring, sharing, etc.

Of course we all do swap games occasionally with friends, I certainly aint gonna pretend I don't. I've pretty much come to terms with the non-transferable licences and from a game studio's point of view I would think it was fantastic. In fairness, with the prices steam charges my friends and I are perfectly happy to pay for them per person especially with multiplayer titles.

In your particular situation I think the blame lies almost entirely on the store you purchased from and your naivety. Out of interest how much did you pay? The orange box is 16.99 and half life 2 is 13.99 here on steam and you could probably have got it under that price new.

CD keys and such have been linked with games/accounts for some years now, its not really a new thing. In future I suggest only buying console games second hand and try to find a good price on new PC games.

ozgeek
11-13-2009, 02:48 AM
You do NOT own the HL2 you have in hand, Valve owns it, regardless of who a copy is in possession of. When you buy software and games, you actually only pay for the RIGHT to play it.

In future, NEVER buy second hand PC games. PC games are easy to pirate and keys are easily stolen and used elsewhere.

When you give a game to your friend, that's one less sale since the friend won't bother to buy it. Times that by millions of people in the world that could do what you do. Possibly millions of potental dollars lost!!

Steam exists also to enforce people to purchase their OWN licence for a game.

Comparing it to a car is a bad analogy. A car is a phyical item. You give it to someone else, you won't have a car for yourself. In games, you give a game to your friend (when you have it still installed in your own computer), he install it on his computer, thus creating another copy without compensation to the game maker. That friend would give the game to another friend...over and over causing great loss. That's why steam DRM exists and will exist for a long time until people start to buy their own copies.

mistygreywolf
11-13-2009, 07:00 AM
I do understand the activation keys and such. I also know that their are crocks out their and I am sorry to force anyone who wants to play the game to purchase a copy is not exactly being an honest business. EX: All the law suits against Microsoft for trying to control how a person uses their own computer. And I guess the real question at hand here is then, why would anyone want to buy anything the only have the right to use in the manner they are ordered to use it in? And I guess in some peoples eyes it is not fair to compare real physical items with digital items but it does not change the fact no mater what anyone says that you purchase a product.

Fine you purchase a key code. If a person purchases a key code why should they not have the Rights to ownership of that key code. In the manner that is being stated here you do not buy anything at all. You just rent it until you do not wish to use it anymore and then you give it back to the seller. DOES THAT MAKE ANY SINCE AT ALL. In that case why even buy it?

If you own the purchased KEY TO ACTIVATE OR A LICENSE TO USE why do you not have the right to transfer that license to those use feel fit to.

There is a huge difference in lending and pirating, even comparing the two is ludicrous. It seems to me that steam views all its customers as thief's who are out to rob them blind. That is bad business and frankly I am a bit offended by their practices.

Every person out there has a right to their own opinion and in mine when you buy you do own. Yes the US government where I live at is trying to take the ownership rights away from the individual customer but they are you have to remember that the US is a capitalistic country and protecting the people from crocked business practice is not even considered when it comes to media, "Non-Material" products. Doesn't it sound a bit ridiculous to say that Non-Material items do not carry the same value as material items.

Heck you can make as bad a game as you wish advertise it to the hilt and take as many people to the bank as you wish and no one can do anything about it because you have no right to return what you do not like or sell it to get your money back you are just a stupid customer who was stupid enough to fall for the companies lies to begin with. Yeah thats real fair business.

The EULA has been defeated in so many countries and has been defeated several times in the US it is just a way for the companies to force you to do business their way and sorry but that is a design for destruction of the business not to mention the economy. People want quality for their money and satisfaction over the product and ownership when they purchase be it a user license or a physical disc.

mistygreywolf
11-13-2009, 07:04 AM
Ok I am done with this. If anyone out there wishes to let the media industry control the use of an imaginary product then so be it.

That is their right.

If you feel that it is a bad business practice and chose to stand up for your rights as a consumer then KUDOS to you.


That is your right as well.

It just seems to me that the issue of an individual consumer's right's are not being considered.

I guess that is steams right as well.

Good luck all and enjoy.

Game on!!!

Oxytropis
11-13-2009, 07:58 AM
Do you remember when..
We used to sing
Sha la la la la la la la la la la ti da
Sha la la la la la la la la la la ti da

mistygreywolf
11-13-2009, 08:20 AM
Do you remember when..
We used to sing
Sha la la la la la la la la la la ti da
Sha la la la la la la la la la la ti da

LOL lol LOL
:p

ozgeek
11-13-2009, 09:32 AM
You know no one is forcing you to buy it. All the information about the product is everywhere if you look. It's just that not many people don't look and think "This won't happen to me".

You have the right to choose whether to buy it and accept the terms.

This is NOT new. It has been around since games was first put out for sale. It was just harder to enforce the EULAs back then but now we have DRM, forcing us to purchase copies for each computer or person.

mistygreywolf
11-13-2009, 01:01 PM
You may be right and if you choose to be controlled in that manner it is your choice. I bought the game on a whim because I had read that it was one of the better games out there. I did not know what steam or valve were all about and I got a great deal, 5 bucks so I am not loosing to much. It is all just about the principle of the issue. I don't give a rats behind how good a game it is, to control how or where and when I can play the game is just down right STUPID BUSINESS PRACTICE. Microsoft tried to just this kind of thing and guess what. Over the past year or two since vista was launched and Microsoft tried to shove their business practice's down the thoughts of the world, They have lost nearly 20% of the market share they used to have to both MAC and Linux.

So is trying to control the users of your products good business or bad.

By the way, now that I know what crooks Valve and steam are, I will not buy their products. I am not that stupid.

Silicon Vampire
11-13-2009, 01:30 PM
All right, that's enough of this. Voicing your opinions is one thing but calling Valve "crooks" is out of line.

Nobody forced you to buy anything, it was your choice to make a purchase on a "whim". It's nobodies fault but your own for not finding out what it was about first.

/end thread