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View Full Version : Fraps drops alot of fps when recording, help please...


awesomealvin
04-22-2012, 03:47 AM
hello, I was playing Sniper Elite v2 demo, runnin on 1080p, max graphics with vsync off, gettin
about 70-120fps, but as soon as I hit the record button, fps goes down to 28-40fps.

Anyone know why, and how to fix it if possible?

My pc specs:
GTX 580 3GB
6GB RAM
I7 960 @3.2GHZ
WINDOWS 7

Apply
04-22-2012, 04:08 AM
Software based capture solutions require quite a bit of effort from your computers processor. In order to avoid this you will need to buy a piece of hardware specificity dedicated to capturing video.

awesomealvin
04-22-2012, 04:37 AM
Software based capture solutions require quite a bit of effort from your computers processor. In order to avoid this you will need to buy a piece of hardware specificity dedicated to capturing video.

ok, well, I want to use fraps for recording, do you know if using a secondary hdd will work?

wychunter
04-22-2012, 08:40 PM
ok, well, I want to use fraps for recording, do you know if using a secondary hdd will work?

Yes, because a hard drive is OBVIOUSLY a better processer

epicphail
04-22-2012, 08:55 PM
you will need to have it recording to a second harddrive and it should help a lot.

leilei
04-22-2012, 09:06 PM
Yes, because a hard drive is OBVIOUSLY a better processer

It is more helpful to use a second well-defragmented drive for realtime file IO than to use the same as your system. This will matter more than a processor upgrade.


You WILL benefit from an additional hard drive.

Bill4Dead
04-22-2012, 10:23 PM
You don't use Fraps to record when your playing. You record a demo of you playing. Then when your done, when you play back the demo, you record that demo with Fraps.

This will take a lot of issues away, such as you trying to record you playing with bad FPS, which will affect your playing. Though depending on your PC hardware and the resolution your recording in, will always be a factor, even recording in the demo. But then you take that raw video and use a video editor to add anything you want to it and to compress it.

But if you still have big FPS issues and you want it better, just OC your video card and CPU just for this task then return them to normal. With doing the demo and that, you shouldn't have any issues.

Thats a big generalisation...

Hardly any game nowadays uses demo recording, and even less let you convert them without a third party program.

Also, in most games using demo record, you can only use it in mp.

awesomealvin
04-22-2012, 11:03 PM
It is more helpful to use a second well-defragmented drive for realtime file IO than to use the same as your system. This will matter more than a processor upgrade.


You WILL benefit from an additional hard drive.

Okay, so how come a secondary drive makes it better, I know it makes it better, but im curious on how it does, because if the hard drive is in my system same as other ones, how come fraps wouldn't really affect the secondary one?

radluke
04-22-2012, 11:50 PM
I found that recording with an external hard drive fixed this problem.

awesomealvin
04-22-2012, 11:53 PM
I found that recording with an external hard drive fixed this problem.

what's the differnce between external hard drive, and internal hard drive?

awesomealvin
04-23-2012, 12:07 AM
It seems like I do have 2 hard drives, they're both the same model, but only 5400 RPM, is that too low?

jdun
04-23-2012, 01:43 AM
what's the differnce between external hard drive, and internal hard drive?

USB drives are slower but they are portable.

5400 RPM is slow but I think it is workable.

Make sure you have two physical HD in your computer. You might have one HD with two partitions that makes it look like you have two physical HD but in reality only one HD.

awesomealvin
04-23-2012, 01:57 AM
USB drives are slower but they are portable.

5400 RPM is slow but I think it is workable.

Make sure you have two physical HD in your computer. You might have one HD with two partitions that makes it look like you have two physical HD but in reality only one HD.

Oh right, so what If i can an SSD, are they faster than 7200 RPM?

Apply
04-23-2012, 03:56 AM
An SSD is faster but if you are going to pay out for one of those then you might as well get a capture card or device instead. I think you can get a capture card from around the same price as a new game.

edit: actually I'm not that sure about the pricing.

awesomealvin
04-23-2012, 04:09 AM
An SSD is faster but if you are going to pay out for one of those then you might as well get a capture card or device instead. I think you can get a capture card from around the same price as a new game.

edit: actually I'm not that sure about the pricing.

umm, Im not that good at finding capture cards, but if anyone could, please help me find a good one for a decent price on this site: http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?p=search&sf=capture&x=49&y=6

What about 10000 rpm hdd or an SSD?

SniperInABush
04-23-2012, 04:21 AM
Fraps...

Lethal_Sting
04-23-2012, 06:53 AM
Okay, so how come a secondary drive makes it better, I know it makes it better, but im curious on how it does, because if the hard drive is in my system same as other ones, how come fraps wouldn't really affect the secondary one?

Because mechanical HDD have round platters.
If the game is
Here.............................................. .................................................. .................................................. And it's recording here.

You can see that the HDD has to spin back and forth, reading then writing, reading, writing.

Mr SmokesAlot
04-23-2012, 07:46 AM
If you record at 30fps the game will drop down to 30fps while recording. Pretty normal.

Lethal_Sting
04-23-2012, 08:56 AM
If you record at 30fps the game will drop down to 30fps while recording. Pretty normal.

With fraps you don't have to lock game frame-rate to the recording frame-rate.

Mr SmokesAlot
04-23-2012, 09:12 AM
With fraps you don't have to lock game frame-rate to the recording frame-rate.

That's odd because mine always do and it have always done so.
*with these settings http://s14.postimage.org/60cf7g0pt/fraps.png

Seems there was an update I missed. Recording at 30 fps while gaming with 60 fps, that's pretty darn epic!

awesomealvin
04-23-2012, 08:35 PM
So guys, from many researching, they to use an hdd. BUT, what if I use an SSD? Which is faster? Also, for an HDD, how many RPM do I need for hardly any fps drop?

gia257
04-23-2012, 10:00 PM
check speeddemosarchive.com knowledge base, they record speedruns, so they know about fraps.

Perfect setup has a small hard disk for your OS (Windows). This hard drive mostly affects boot time. SSD are used to have very fast boots, but SSDs are not meant for heavy writing so you'd have to configure windows to have its Temp folder on a partition outside this hard drive, unless you have the money to spare...

A bigger disk instead, but partitioned, or a separate one for your programs and everyday files (office, cat pictures, whatever). This one can be 5400RPM unless you have some specific programs that load a lot of stuff and you use regularly.

A huge hard disk for your Steam games (just because you'll probably get to hundreds of steam games eventually), if its high RPM the games will load faster, but if you can live with slower loads then 5400 saves energy (these are called "green" usually).

A huge hard disk (2TB disks are on the market) with high RPM and high bandwidth (SATA 3 nowadays) for recording games. High RPM for average people is 7200RPM (the average speed), anything over that starts to cost double, and that's server grade anyway. To take advantage of the speed you'll need the bandwidth, so make sure your motherboard can pull it off (ie the mobo has to support SATA 3). To get even faster speed you need to make a RAID with them (add more disks), and of course you need to ensure you can make use of the bandwidth. SSD is the next step (final step?), and is the last thing you'd get price-wise. I can record decently with a single 7200RPM disk on SATA 2 by the way.

The disk is better separate because fraps will be writing on it non-stop (or attempting to), so its best if the disk is not doing anything else but working on fraps stuff. If you have the OS and/or the game on the same disk they may be doing some read/writes to different sectors and as such stop your recording for a tiny little bit, if the read/writes are constant (eg a loading screen) then your video frame skips will be constant as well.

You don't want to record to an external hard drive unless you got at least USB 3.0, USB 2.0 doesn't have the bandwidth to record good quality.

Processor wise, get at least two cores so one can run the game and the other fraps. And if your game uses more than one core (and needs it) then you'd need 'n' cores +1, for fraps.

About the motherboard, the higher the bandwidth the better. this doesn't make fraps run faster, it allows your hardware to run full speed. If it isn't up to par, it will limit their speed.

Fraps has the ability to record pixel perfect videos, with the lossless RGB mode, full screen, and provided you have enough power to record at the same fps the game outputs video. But usually you won't so it will lack on the fps department, the fps won't be constant, frame skips. People can live with it though.

If you want a hardware solution, get a good dvd recorder with a hard drive. Video quality won't be as good (lossy) but the fps will be constant and smooth.


tl;dr version

External & Cheap alternative: Dvd Recorder
Fraps Cheap alternative: 1 internal, 7200RPM, SATA 2 or 3, 1-2TB HDD, dedicated to recording.

You are rich alternative: do whatever you want, I dont care

awesomealvin
04-23-2012, 11:45 PM
check speeddemosarchive.com knowledge base, they record speedruns, so they know about fraps.

Perfect setup has a small hard disk for your OS (Windows). This hard drive mostly affects boot time. SSD are used to have very fast boots, but SSDs are not meant for heavy writing so you'd have to configure windows to have its Temp folder on a partition outside this hard drive, unless you have the money to spare...

A bigger disk instead, but partitioned, or a separate one for your programs and everyday files (office, cat pictures, whatever). This one can be 5400RPM unless you have some specific programs that load a lot of stuff and you use regularly.

A huge hard disk for your Steam games (just because you'll probably get to hundreds of steam games eventually), if its high RPM the games will load faster, but if you can live with slower loads then 5400 saves energy (these are called "green" usually).

A huge hard disk (2TB disks are on the market) with high RPM and high bandwidth (SATA 3 nowadays) for recording games. High RPM for average people is 7200RPM (the average speed), anything over that starts to cost double, and that's server grade anyway. To take advantage of the speed you'll need the bandwidth, so make sure your motherboard can pull it off (ie the mobo has to support SATA 3). To get even faster speed you need to make a RAID with them (add more disks), and of course you need to ensure you can make use of the bandwidth. SSD is the next step (final step?), and is the last thing you'd get price-wise. I can record decently with a single 7200RPM disk on SATA 2 by the way.

The disk is better separate because fraps will be writing on it non-stop (or attempting to), so its best if the disk is not doing anything else but working on fraps stuff. If you have the OS and/or the game on the same disk they may be doing some read/writes to different sectors and as such stop your recording for a tiny little bit, if the read/writes are constant (eg a loading screen) then your video frame skips will be constant as well.

You don't want to record to an external hard drive unless you got at least USB 3.0, USB 2.0 doesn't have the bandwidth to record good quality.

Processor wise, get at least two cores so one can run the game and the other fraps. And if your game uses more than one core (and needs it) then you'd need 'n' cores +1, for fraps.

About the motherboard, the higher the bandwidth the better. this doesn't make fraps run faster, it allows your hardware to run full speed. If it isn't up to par, it will limit their speed.

Fraps has the ability to record pixel perfect videos, with the lossless RGB mode, full screen, and provided you have enough power to record at the same fps the game outputs video. But usually you won't so it will lack on the fps department, the fps won't be constant, frame skips. People can live with it though.

If you want a hardware solution, get a good dvd recorder with a hard drive. Video quality won't be as good (lossy) but the fps will be constant and smooth.


tl;dr version

External & Cheap alternative: Dvd Recorder
Fraps Cheap alternative: 1 internal, 7200RPM, SATA 2 or 3, 1-2TB HDD, dedicated to recording.

You are rich alternative: do whatever you want, I dont care

Wow, thanks for the details, I could get a capture card, but I don't know which one to select. If you could help, could you help me find a decent one with a good price?
I don't know which ones are good on this site http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?p=search&sf=capture&x=0&y=0&o=price&d=a

thanks.

awesomealvin
04-24-2012, 12:52 AM
OH WOW, I just found a program like Fraps, it's called DXTORY, it records way more smooth than fraps.. >.>.

I guess I'll just use that for now.
Thanks guys for your help, I really appreciated it.