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View Full Version : Will a 50 foot HDMI cable work fine?


endoftheline
05-09-2009, 04:30 PM
I want to connect my PC [running win xp, or win7 @ 1920*1200] to my HDTV via HDMI over a distance that will require a 50ft cable to travel. I have found a few HDMI cables that are 50ft, but I see some question about if a 1080P signal can travel that far with no issues. Basically I will be playing 1080p and 720p .AVI & .MKV video files on my PC in windows media player and VLC media player, and then I plan to connect my HDTV to one of my DVI ports on my PC's GTX 260, with a DVI-HDMI adaptor, and then hopefully use a 50 HDMI cable to get it to the HDTV.

I'm looking for information as to how well a 50ft HDMI cable will work in this situation. I have found this one:

http://www.amazon.com/GOLD-PREMIUM-HDMI-CABLE-HDTV/dp/B000XQ0FDI/ref=pd_cp_e_2?pf_rd_p=413863501&pf_rd_s=center-41&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0015LTBYE&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1X0EDADAEJ6HX3HCN2EA

also this one with a "signal boster"

http://www.amazon.com/HDMI-Cable-Signal-Booster-Combo/dp/B000TACOFA

Any idea about these?

lhwj
05-09-2009, 04:32 PM
50 feet seems to be the upper limit for HDMI cables. http://www.abccables.com/info-hdmi-max-length.html

Luke

endoftheline
05-09-2009, 05:26 PM
Hum, that article seems to indicate loss can occur when using 10-50foot cables. Thats a pretty huge range, I'm wondering if anyone has actually used a 50foot or longer cable and observed how the signal loss was?

dfrench
05-11-2009, 02:16 PM
I have not used a 50 ft cable, but I have used a 33ft one. I know the below website carries the 50 footers, and like I said I have never had any loss with my 33. They are also really well priced, and free shipping =) Hope that helps!

http://www.optimization-world.com

rotNdude
05-11-2009, 02:28 PM
I don't trust a cable any further than I can spit without the data to back it up:

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/articles/how-long-can-hdmi-run.htm

OmegaXtreme420
05-11-2009, 06:18 PM
mine for the ps3 is only like 12 ft i think

TheMG
05-11-2009, 07:28 PM
It's kind of hit-or-miss, some cables may work just fine with 1080p at 50ft, and some others not.

What you'll need to do is read up on some reviews and find a cable that people have has success with at 1080p.

Cable length really is the enemy for high-bitrate signals. Long cables and high resolutions is when cable quality starts to matter. Now, this does not mean you won't find a reasonably priced 50ft cable that will work, quality can be had for a lower price if you look in the right places.

cyclic
05-12-2009, 01:13 AM
The loss of signal is due to a degrading of the ability of the voltage, to push the current through the conductor, this 'impedence' as we commonly call it is lower in higher quality copper. Best signal carrying copper is made excluding oxygen to prevent chemical impurities.
You will pay a premium for 'oxygen free' copper cables, but it's the best bet for low voltage use.

TheMG
05-12-2009, 05:44 AM
The loss of signal is due to a degrading of the ability of the voltage, to push the current through the conductor, this 'impedence' as we commonly call it is lower in higher quality copper. Best signal carrying copper is made excluding oxygen to prevent chemical impurities.
You will pay a premium for 'oxygen free' copper cables, but it's the best bet for low voltage use.

Actually this would be true for DC, but at high bitrates weird things happen. The conductor resistance really is the least of your concerns with high bitrates.

Basically, a high bitrate digital signal behave like a very high frequency AC signal. At these high frequencies, two characteristics of cable become a concern: capacitance and inductance.

Capacitance has the effect of "loading down" the signal, while inductance increases the apparent resistance along the cable. The overall effect is distortion and attenuation of the signal along the cable. When the signal gets too weak and/or too distorted, the receiver can no longer differentiate properly between 1s and 0s, and you get data loss.

Cable construction and the insulating materials used do play quite a big role in the inductance and capacitance of a cable. These combine to form a cable's characteristic impedance, which has nothing to do with its DC resistance.

endoftheline
05-13-2009, 01:22 PM
I don't trust a cable any further than I can spit without the data to back it up:

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/articles/how-long-can-hdmi-run.htm

Hum, this seems to indicate that a 50foot HDMI should work OK, especially if its of a better grade?
Does anyone know of a specific 50foot HDMI cable that is of a higher grade that might work for this? I've been looking and I can only seem to find a few cheaper 50footers.

Also people have suggested this HDMI over cat6 adapter, does this seem like it might work:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882754006&Tpk=hdmi%20extender

rotNdude
05-13-2009, 01:34 PM
Did you look through that link I posted?

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/hdmi-cables/index.htm

endoftheline
05-15-2009, 03:54 AM
Did you look through that link I posted?

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/hdmi-cables/index.htm

Yes, thanks I see Bluejeanscable has a 50footer that is HDMI 1.3, and they say should handle the 1080p fine. It does cost $144.50, but If that's the only one that will work, I may go with it. I'm looking at other cables to see if theres anything else cheaper that may work.

sooNAHmee
12-09-2009, 03:25 PM
I'm really surprised that nobody has linked to Monoprice: http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10240
They have HDMI cables up 100'. I have the "flat" style ones (although only available up to 35'), and they are VERY high quality for head-scratchingly low prices.

50 footer for $46:http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024002&p_id=2804&seq=1&format=2
They have silver plated conductor ones for $91 too:http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024002&p_id=2678&seq=1&format=2
...if you feel you need a "better" cable.

Keep in mind that HDMI and DVI are transmitting a digital signal as opposed to older cables like Component Video and S-Video that carry analog signals. I mention this because with digital, basically either the cable works, or it doesn't. Worst case scenario with HDMI/DVI is you may get artifacts on the display - an indication that you need a better cable. It's not like analog where a better shielded cable will block out interference and result in a better picture. These are 1's and 0's your sending; either they get there, or they don't.

EDIT: I just wanted to add that companies like Monster Cable don't want people to know this; they want ignorant Best Buy customers to buy a $150 cable to go with their new LCD because they think it will result in a better picture. Cables have become a bit of a marketing scam these days.

marie pavie
12-09-2009, 03:49 PM
You could get a booster too.

edit
Don't skimp on the cable lifters (http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue25/images/Blue%20Circle%20Room%20-%20Cable%20Lifters%20Manual.jpg).

sooNAHmee
12-09-2009, 06:03 PM
Don't skimp on the cable lifters (http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue25/images/Blue%20Circle%20Room%20-%20Cable%20Lifters%20Manual.jpg).Those are sweet! Only for a true audiophile [coughcoughfetishistcough]

Big O
12-09-2009, 07:43 PM
When you get to extreme lengths like that, the quality of HDMI cables start to really matter, especially is you're pushing a 1080p signal through it. Be prepared to spend a pretty penny on that cable, like in the range of a few hundred.

here's a couple of tests ran on the subject

http://gizmodo.com/268788/the-truth-about-monster-cable-part-2-verdict-cheap-cables-keep-upusually

http://gizmodo.com/282725/the-truth-about-monster-cable-+-grand-finale-part-iii

Bulletbrain7
12-09-2009, 09:20 PM
When you get to extreme lengths like that, the quality of HDMI cables start to really matter, especially is you're pushing a 1080p signal through it. Be prepared to spend a pretty penny on that cable, like in the range of a few hundred.

here's a couple of tests ran on the subject

http://gizmodo.com/268788/the-truth-about-monster-cable-part-2-verdict-cheap-cables-keep-upusually

http://gizmodo.com/282725/the-truth-about-monster-cable-+-grand-finale-part-iii

Did you even read the articles:

" Even if you're going for the long haul, try a cheaper cable from a reliable vendor first. Monoprice isn't the only one. During this process I've spoken with good people at FireFold, DataPro International, and others, and tested an assortment of discount products, with no noticeable problems. I am confident that, if a vendor has a solid return policy and satisfaction guarantee, you should feel free to buy even a super-long cable from a discount house. In the case of my 50-footer noise, a quick return would have been all that was required.


The ultimate conclusion from the testing, found at the end of part III:

So, even if you are going for a 50ft (long haul) buy the cheaper ones first.

You don't run out and spend hundreds of dollars.

Big O
12-09-2009, 10:11 PM
Did you even read the articles:




The ultimate conclusion from the testing, found at the end of part III:

So, even if you are going for a 50ft (long haul) buy the cheaper ones first.

You don't run out and spend hundreds of dollars.

I did, and I believe of the 50' cables one worked well, the other failed. If you like 50/50 odds...

Spunkie
12-09-2009, 11:25 PM
Since you said you would be playing .avi and .mkv containers your already using a compressed encode. Worrying about if you can get full HD quality over that length is kinda redundant at that point.

..... just saying >_>

Bulletbrain7
12-09-2009, 11:26 PM
I did, and I believe of the 50' cables one worked well, the other failed. If you like 50/50 odds...

LOL. And you still didn't read the article. It was much better than 50/50. And the article states that:

It never pays to buy a Monster cable first. It doesn't even make sense to buy the "marked down" $50 cable you can buy if you don't want Monster. Go online, order your cables, and wait.

Don't post to save face. Just say, I missed that and move on:

Monoprice 35-ft In-Wall CL2 ($35.17)
Test 1: Sony PS3 with Hellboy BD
All good

Test 2: Samsung BD-P1200 with Happy Feet BD
All good

Monster 1000HD 35-ft ($250)
Test 1: Sony PS3 with Hellboy BD
All good

Test 2: Samsung BD-P1200 with Happy Feet BD
All good

Monoprice 50-ft In-Wall CL2 ($53.64)
Test 1: Sony PS3 with Hellboy BD
All good

Test 2: Samsung BD-P1200 with Happy Feet BD
What the...? Is that screen noise?
There was actually quite a lot of noise—a bouncing picture that happened so frequently I was able to capture the effect with a still camera. I was able to reproduce the noise with some consistency, too. Here's the noise detail for you to scrutinize:

While it may seem conclusive that the 50-foot Monoprice is not a good choice, I was fortunate enough to have another 50-footer from the company, one that was not part of the original lab test. When I used it, I was not able to reproduce the noise. Furthermore, I double-checked the noisy cable on the Sony Bravia KDF-37H1000 with 1080p input (but 720p display) and again could not duplicate it.

The missing piece is Monster's "No Frills" $300 50-footer. I know some of you wish I had tested it, that it had been part of this from the beginning. I don't have a time machine to fix that, but I will say that, given how the Monster 35 footer (10M) did in the lab, chances are you're not going to see noise on the Monster 50 footer.

For the love of God, what does it all mean???
I have to say I for one have learned a few things with all of this testing, and I hope you have too. The way I see it:

• It never pays to buy a Monster cable first. It doesn't even make sense to buy the "marked down" $50 cable you can buy if you don't want Monster. Go online, order your cables, and wait.

• Even if you're going for the long haul, try a cheaper cable from a reliable vendor first. Monoprice isn't the only one. During this process I've spoken with good people at FireFold, DataPro International, and others, and tested an assortment of discount products, with no noticeable problems. I am confident that, if a vendor has a solid return policy and satisfaction guarantee, you should feel free to buy even a super-long cable from a discount house. In the case of my 50-footer noise, a quick return would have been all that was required.

• Monster has a point about future-proofing. I have no doubt, given our testing, that Monster cables can outperform other cables in video formats that are not yet in use. What does this mean for a consumer? Does it make sense to spend $300 now on a 50-foot cable, assuming you will spend thousands to upgrade all of your video equipment around it in the next few years? Logic dictates that the answer is no.

• The only people who should buy Monster cable are people who light cigars with Benjamins. Fortunately for Monster, there are plenty of those people. They're not even suckers, they are just rich as hell, and want the best. This testing did not prove that Monster is not the best. It just proved that the best is, for the most part, unnecessary.

This was not the easiest task to undertake, and I appreciate everyone who helped out with encouragement, tips, wisdom and wild speculation. I hope it was both entertaining and educational. For me, if I never look at another cable it will be too soon.

There is no way I would throw down hundreds of dollars if I could get away with a cable under $50. If all I have to do is order one and see if it works, then that is what I am going to do. It isn't going to hurt your equipment. Why keep on giving the bad advice? You said for us to rely on the article you posted. The article says don't throw your money away. But you tell us to anyway and to ignore the article.

And it was a good, and helpful article that you found, why wreck it? I mean the situation is much better than we thought. We still don't have a reason to get ripped off my Monster.

Now the OP can order cables from:


• Even if you're going for the long haul, try a cheaper cable from a reliable vendor first. Monoprice isn't the only one. During this process I've spoken with good people at FireFold (http://www.firefold.com/), DataPro International (http://www.datapro.net/), and others, and tested an assortment of discount products, with no noticeable problems. I am confident that, if a vendor has a solid return policy and satisfaction guarantee, you should feel free to buy even a super-long cable from a discount house. In the case of my 50-footer noise, a quick return would have been all that was required.

endoftheline
12-10-2009, 01:02 AM
Heh, I'm not sure how this old thread I started was bumped, But I can agree with bulletbrain's conclusion 100%.

Back when I posted this, I ended up buying this exact cable from monoprice:

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024005&p_id=2110&seq=1&format=2

I got the cable in June of 2009, and I have been using it with 0 problems since that time from my GTX 260, to my Sharp 46" 1080P TV.

I have been playing 1080P .AVI's, .MKV's with no problems and played world of warcraft, and crysis all perfectly.

So basically yes, just try the $40 50" cable, don't let the doubters persuade you to get some monster crap.
That 50" cable will run 1080P just fine.

dfrench
12-15-2009, 10:03 AM
This one has some that push up to 50ft. I called and they said it is no problem at all.
http://www.hdmicable1080p.org