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View Full Version : If a buy a game that's also on steam, can I put it on steam?


ziggybozbo
10-11-2009, 09:41 PM
I recently ordered Operation Flashpoint Dragon Rising off of Amazon; Once I get it, will I be able to add it to steam and have all the benefits of steam (i.e. automatic updates & patches)? or will i only be able to add it as a non-steam game, even though it is? Thanks for any help.
EDIT: sorry for the stupid title, i forgot to check it over.

sciss0rz
10-11-2009, 09:43 PM
Only if the game is listed here (https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=7480-WUSF-3601)

ziggybozbo
10-11-2009, 10:14 PM
Only if the game is listed here (https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=7480-WUSF-3601)
well that sucks. I mean, if it's a legitimate copy, i should be able to use it with steam.

Cedge
10-11-2009, 10:17 PM
well that sucks. I mean, if it's a legitimate copy, i should be able to use it with steam.

Why?

Why should Valve give you a copy of the game on Steam, allowing you to use their bandwidth, resources, and features, for a retail game purchase you made that they didn't get a single penny of?

The retail games that can be activated on Steam are special cases, where the publisher has made a special hybrid physical/digital distribution contract with Valve. Valve gets a cut of those sales.

I've said it several times before, but I simply do not understand where people get this notion that Steam is, or should be, a free service providing downloadable copies of any retail game you buy, or have bought in the past.

ziggybozbo
10-11-2009, 10:38 PM
Why?

Why should Valve give you a copy of the game on Steam, allowing you to use their bandwidth, resources, and features, for a retail game purchase you made that they didn't get a single penny of?

The retail games that can be activated on Steam are special cases, where the publisher has made a special hybrid physical/digital distribution contract with Valve. Valve gets a cut of those sales.

I've said it several times before, but I simply do not understand where people get this notion that Steam is, or should be, a free service providing downloadable copies of any retail game you buy, or have bought in the past.
Good point; it's just my opinion that that's how steam should be used, but obviously, that's the wrong way.

Cedge
10-11-2009, 10:40 PM
Yeah, it just can't work that way. I mean, you can't exactly go on iTunes and get free iTunes copies of every CD you've ever bought either, ya know?

ziggybozbo
10-11-2009, 11:02 PM
Yeah, it just can't work that way. I mean, you can't exactly go on iTunes and get free iTunes copies of every CD you've ever bought either, ya know?
Actually I'm glad you brought that up; let me compare steam to itunes for a minute: on itunes, you can buy songs and whatnot, just like steam, BUT on itunes, you can add your own CDs to your itunes library AND, as long as the album is on itunes, then itunes will label all the tracks and get you the album cover (plus you can now play them on your ipod). Now, who really cares that they can't download the songs digitally and not use the CD? I don't. So, comparing that to steam, it's pretty similar except that you can't truly add games even if they're on steam. I mean, I'd be more than willing to install the game via my own disk if steam's worried about me clogging up their bandwith or whatever. I'd even be willing to pay $5, maybe even $10 for all my steam-games-that-i-didnt-buy-on-steam-but-are-available-on-steam. I don't see the problem.

Hack Scudder
10-11-2009, 11:11 PM
I'd be more than willing to install the game via my own disk if steam's worried about me clogging up their bandwith or whatever.
If you want to install it yourself, then what benefit are you looking for? Like Cedge said, keeping your game updated will cost Valve money in bandwidth. That is a service they offer as part of the price of buying the game through Steam. It makes no sense to allow everyone with a retail version to use their bandwidth. If you just want it in your Steam games list, you can add any application to the list by going to Games>Add a non-Steam game to My Games list. But all that does is add a shortcut.

ziggybozbo
10-11-2009, 11:14 PM
If you want to install it yourself, then what benefit are you looking for? If you just want it in your Steam games list, you can add any application to the list by going to Games>Add a non-Steam game to My Games list. But all that does is add a shortcut.
whatever i'll stop worrying about it now.

Cedge
10-11-2009, 11:30 PM
Actually I'm glad you brought that up; let me compare steam to itunes for a minute: on itunes, you can buy songs and whatnot, just like steam, BUT on itunes, you can add your own CDs to your itunes library AND, as long as the album is on itunes, then itunes will label all the tracks and get you the album cover

Well, there is a reason that can work for CDs, but not for games.

iTunes pulls all of its track data from the Gracenote (a company owned by Sony) CD Database, which is an enormous database that catalogs information about millions of CD releases. iTunes uses the database to determine the identity of the disc using a hash check of the disc's TOC (the part of a CD that contains layout information for the disc), and then uses that disc's entry in the database to pull down information about the tracks, the cover art, et cetera.

So, iTunes' tagging abilities are thanks to preexisting CD information databases (which Apple pays for access to). There is no such automated, definitive database/catalog for game patches.

So, comparing that to steam, it's pretty similar except that you can't truly add games even if they're on steam.
Again, that's not the point of Steam. It's not meant to provide all the unique features of games bought on Steam, for games that you've bought somewhere else (and that aren't Steam-integrated titles, like FEAR 2, or the like).

I mean, I'd be more than willing to install the game via my own disk if steam's worried about me clogging up their bandwith or whatever. I'd even be willing to pay $5, maybe even $10 for all my steam-games-that-i-didnt-buy-on-steam-but-are-available-on-steam. I don't see the problem.
The problem is that automated patching of all PC games ever is not Steam's purpose.

ziggybozbo
10-11-2009, 11:36 PM
Well, there is a reason that can work for CDs, but not for games.

iTunes pulls all of its track data from the Gracenote (a company owned by Sony) CD Database, which is an enormous database that catalogs information about hundreds of thousands of CD releases. iTunes uses the database to determine the identity of the disc using a hash check of the disc's TOC, and then uses that disc's entry in the database to pull down information about the tracks, the cover art, et cetera.

So, iTunes' tagging abilities are thanks to preexisting CD information databases (which Apple pays for access to). There is no such automated, definitive database/catalog for game patches.


Again, that's not the point of Steam. It's not meant to provide all the unique features of games bought on Steam, for games that you've bought somewhere else (and that aren't Steam-integrated titles, like FEAR 2, or the like).


The problem is that automated patching of all PC games ever is not Steam's purpose.
k, got it.