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Old 05-01-2012, 05:48 PM   #1
aegix drakan
 
Join Date: May 2011
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Well, that was...sudden *MAJOR SPOILERS*

Soo...That's the ending? You go to a hospital, take a pill, trippy ending and that's it?

I was expecting one last area (the hospital) to sneak through...The city didn't feel much like a final level...The basement was way more intense and hard.

I never met the pale faced guy a third time despite him saying we would meet 3 times, and I didn't manage to cure hank, despite giving him all the heal tonics (5 of them) that I could find (although that might be because I gave him some blue pills before I gave him the medicine...). It just felt like it ended a little too fast...

Well, whatever. It was still pretty fun. Definitely worth the 7 bucks.

I got the green ending and...C+ mental health? Really? Huh...I thought I did better than that...Well, C+ isn't bad, I guess. ...Time to play this game again and go properly crazy.
>: P

Just a few post game questions...
Is instant ramen a bad food to eat? What about ground meat?
Does playing the gamejoy reduce, or increase sanity?
Can you ACTUALLY cure Hank at the gun store? Or can you only bring him up to "not feeling too bad, actually"?

Thanks for any answers.
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:10 AM   #2
DadouXIII
 
 
 
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You didn't fully cure Hank because yes you gave him blue pills...
To cure him "fully", you just need to give him the 5 tonics, without any pill...

Instant Ramen, Ground meat and Octopus on a Stick are all bad food...
I think the Gamejoy increases your sanity


I finished the game 3 times so far.
1st time blue ending, sanity E-
2nd time green ending sanity C-
3rd time green ending sanity B
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Old 05-02-2012, 06:27 AM   #3
Jaapie
 
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I can only answer your question regarding the pale faced man. You should see him in the green ending when you lie down, and the screen transitions, he comes in clearly and briefly in a close-up view but doesn't say anything.

What it means? Who knows, I'm still trying to figure out who he is. He could be the guy who wears a box over his head. They both seem to guide you.
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Old 05-04-2012, 06:56 AM   #4
Sefam
 
 
 
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It makes a lot more sense when you take into account the dialogue, the characters around, and compare all three endings(Red, blue, and green). Red for now is only a variation of the blue ending.

It's pretty obvious that You went through some major trauma involving the loss of his girlfriend, and that he probably intends to suicide after picking up the gun and Chie is trying to help him end his misery; just look at Chie's dialogue, why would she answer "I'm not one to judge" after You says "At least you realize I need the protection". Also notice how using the gun to kill things lower your sanity.

After the director dies, You decides to go to the hospital for treatment.

In the Red ending, You shoots the man in blue, and in the process, it also applies the wound to himself, probably making him commit suicide, and spends his afterlife with his girlfriend.

In the Blue ending, You shoots the man in blue, but then he just keeps taunting you. I guess in this ending, You doesn't really die, but ends up in a coma and doesn't wake up. After all, the ending track is called "Sleep Forever". Then he spends his dream with his girlfriend. Also, about the Red and the Blue ending, notice the dialogue at the beginning of the girl scene, it's the same as the one in the generator room where You hallucinates.

In the Green ending, You remembers and comes to terms with himself, and what his girlfriend made him promise. He ends up on a hill, alone, looking back at the city. He looks older, but he's still alive. After all, the track playing in that end is called "Survival", which is totally awesome.

Usually, most people get the blue ending first, then they play back through the game and get the green ending, which is much much more satisfying after seeing the blue one.

Now the part that is a bit hard to analyze, is whether he's just hallucinating everything and is actually in the hospital all the game, because the ending statistics do say "Days in treatment". As for the face paled man, I'm not even sure what he is supposed to represent, although the dialogue of his second encounter changes according to your sanity!
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:15 PM   #5
MEMANIA
 
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There's a lot of symbolism... I'm not a fan of symbolism that much.

I've heard that this is related to the "War" that keeps being referenced though, so people ARE crazy infected (or maybe You and Hank are infected and see things differently.) There are destroyed walls, wrecked buses, etc. in the City, and newspapers in some of the rooms describing a war outside the city.

My real question here is... who the hell is Draco?! Is that You? The Pale Faced Man? The Man in Blue? Someone we never meet?
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:21 AM   #6
MEMANIA
 
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Something I found on GameFAQs:

"Finished the game, saw both endings.
I think it's safe to say that we're dealing with Silent Hill-esque symbolism here: not everything is as it seems, maybe nothing is. Maybe it's all in his head.

I think the gist of it is the girl was his girlfriend or wife (or someone equally close to him). She died of an illness (much like Mary in Silent Hill 2) and he refuses to accept it. He even goes as far as to remove her from his memories. Depending on how he deals with the loss (i.e. going through the game) his mental health improves or deteriorates. If he reacts with violence, killing a lot of monsters, giving Hank the pills for ammo, etc. he'll curl up further and further into his twisted psyche until he commits suicide (blue ending). That way, however, he's with her (I interpret them being together in the blue ending as the afterlife).

If he tries to work around monsters, favours social interactions (the cat, Chie, etc.) he gets the Green ending which basically means he accepts and rationalizes the loss and moves on. At the end of the Green ending he is slightly aged, but still alive (and alone, since she's dead).

The man in blue (blue ending) represents his violent impulses. The man with the box represents his meditative side. Both represent himself; the man in blue IS him as an older man. I don't know if the box man is him too, because the game doesn't give that kind of indication. However, the man in the box is an accurate representation of him "living in his own box" and refusing to acknowledge anything that's outside of his mind. Maybe the box man is a symbol for "reality" - he is showing him the way he really is. Whereas getting close to the man in blue means getting more and more tangled up in his own sick mind.

I'm stumped as to whether the infestation really happened, anyway. Maybe it's all in his head, and it's meant to represent his harrowing view of the outside world without her. Once she died, he shut himself off and feels safe only within the confines of his room (or his mind). Similarly, venturing outside is a terrifying and potentially deadly endeavour. After the first encounter with Chie at the party I had the idea he was really killing innocents believing them to be monsters, but I don't think that's really the case. The others do not seem to acknowledge the monsters however - see Benzido's reactions, or some of The Director's answers. Only Hank seems to share his world vision.

I also can't find a place for The Director, Hank or the White-Faced man. Some have said White-Face is another projection of himself. I can't find any grounds for that, honestly.

He may be in the hospital the entire time, or maybe the monsters are real and he escaped. Maybe it's all in his head and he's revisiting those places in a dream while physically he never left the hospital (and taking the final pill actually wakes him up?). It's actually pretty remarkable to be able to toe this line between dream and reality and leave the interpretation completely open (full-on dream or 100% reality are both feasible explanations).

In Silent Hill, monsters are a projection of one's own inner fears and weaknesses. While most of LS is inspired by Silent Hill, it's also a lot less explicit with its inner workings, so I'm not taking that explanation so readily. Obviously a lot was left to interpretation. However, the Silent Hill references are so heavy throughout that you could almost think he wants you to take the mechanics of Silent Hill for granted.

Whatever the truth, I thoroughly enjoyed this game. I hope Jasper adds a couple endings like he said he would to clear at least a few things up."
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:15 PM   #7
DadouXIII
 
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MEMANIA View Post
Something I found on GameFAQs:

"Finished the game, saw both endings.
I think it's safe to say that we're dealing with Silent Hill-esque symbolism here: not everything is as it seems, maybe nothing is. Maybe it's all in his head.

I think the gist of it is the girl was his girlfriend or wife (or someone equally close to him). She died of an illness (much like Mary in Silent Hill 2) and he refuses to accept it. He even goes as far as to remove her from his memories. Depending on how he deals with the loss (i.e. going through the game) his mental health improves or deteriorates. If he reacts with violence, killing a lot of monsters, giving Hank the pills for ammo, etc. he'll curl up further and further into his twisted psyche until he commits suicide (blue ending). That way, however, he's with her (I interpret them being together in the blue ending as the afterlife).

If he tries to work around monsters, favours social interactions (the cat, Chie, etc.) he gets the Green ending which basically means he accepts and rationalizes the loss and moves on. At the end of the Green ending he is slightly aged, but still alive (and alone, since she's dead).

The man in blue (blue ending) represents his violent impulses. The man with the box represents his meditative side. Both represent himself; the man in blue IS him as an older man. I don't know if the box man is him too, because the game doesn't give that kind of indication. However, the man in the box is an accurate representation of him "living in his own box" and refusing to acknowledge anything that's outside of his mind. Maybe the box man is a symbol for "reality" - he is showing him the way he really is. Whereas getting close to the man in blue means getting more and more tangled up in his own sick mind.

I'm stumped as to whether the infestation really happened, anyway. Maybe it's all in his head, and it's meant to represent his harrowing view of the outside world without her. Once she died, he shut himself off and feels safe only within the confines of his room (or his mind). Similarly, venturing outside is a terrifying and potentially deadly endeavour. After the first encounter with Chie at the party I had the idea he was really killing innocents believing them to be monsters, but I don't think that's really the case. The others do not seem to acknowledge the monsters however - see Benzido's reactions, or some of The Director's answers. Only Hank seems to share his world vision.

I also can't find a place for The Director, Hank or the White-Faced man. Some have said White-Face is another projection of himself. I can't find any grounds for that, honestly.

He may be in the hospital the entire time, or maybe the monsters are real and he escaped. Maybe it's all in his head and he's revisiting those places in a dream while physically he never left the hospital (and taking the final pill actually wakes him up?). It's actually pretty remarkable to be able to toe this line between dream and reality and leave the interpretation completely open (full-on dream or 100% reality are both feasible explanations).

In Silent Hill, monsters are a projection of one's own inner fears and weaknesses. While most of LS is inspired by Silent Hill, it's also a lot less explicit with its inner workings, so I'm not taking that explanation so readily. Obviously a lot was left to interpretation. However, the Silent Hill references are so heavy throughout that you could almost think he wants you to take the mechanics of Silent Hill for granted.

Whatever the truth, I thoroughly enjoyed this game. I hope Jasper adds a couple endings like he said he would to clear at least a few things up."
Finally an explanation that makes sense...
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