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Old 11-24-2011, 01:32 AM   #1
paulos2br
 
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Steam on Skyrim for the Mac

So recently unofficial ports for the Mac have been released for Skyrim. I am eager to get my hands on the game but I don't want to install the game through windows for these ports like ciderx. Because these ports have been released so quickly after the game release does it mean that Steam will soon have their version of Mac compatible Skyrim ready for sale? Does anyone know or shed more light on the topic. Many thanks
 
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Old 11-24-2011, 01:37 AM   #2
marco_polo
 
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Originally Posted by paulos2br View Post
So recently unofficial ports for the Mac have been released for Skyrim. I am eager to get my hands on the game but I don't want to install the game through windows for these ports like ciderx. Because these ports have been released so quickly after the game release does it mean that Steam will soon have their version of Mac compatible Skyrim ready for sale? Does anyone know or shed more light on the topic. Many thanks
I don't think there was ever a mac port for Oblivion or Fallout 3 / New Vegas so I wouldn't hold out too much hope to be honest.
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:58 AM   #3
paulos2br
 
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I don't think there was ever a mac port for Oblivion or Fallout 3 / New Vegas so I wouldn't hold out too much hope to be honest.
You are talking about on Steam right? Because out there there are ports for Oblivion and Fallout 3, though they are not done through Steam. I hope Steam gets its act together. I may just have to get it on Xbox.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:01 AM   #4
keiskay2
 
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steam has no control over if bethesda uploads the mac versions or not. also if there are legal mac ports can you post them.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:02 AM   #5
Fluxman
 
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your first mistake was buying a Mac and expecting to play games on it :P lol
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:09 AM   #6
marco_polo
 
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Originally Posted by paulos2br View Post
You are talking about on Steam right? Because out there there are ports for Oblivion and Fallout 3, though they are not done through Steam. I hope Steam gets its act together. I may just have to get it on Xbox.
I don't see any trace of an official OSX port from Bethesda for any of these games on the web?
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:29 AM   #7
JohnQQ
 
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OP is assuming that unofficial ports for Macs are uploaded to Steam for purchase. Games like Assassin's Creed are OFFICIALLY ported by a company hired by Ubisoft. Games like Skyrim are unofficially ported by individuals, most likely users from the "The Porting Team"-forum.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:33 AM   #8
sarid
 
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your first mistake was buying a Mac and expecting to play games on it :P lol
this

if you want to play games on your mac you just need to do what ever other mac user does and install windows on it but blaming steam for why games dont have mac versions is probably one of the dumbest things i have seen on these forums as steam is a distributor, not the publisher for each game
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Old 11-24-2011, 05:10 PM   #9
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Okay. I thought that Steam employed its own staff to manufacture games for the PC to the Mac. I have only recently acquired Steam so didn't know about its specifications. Also I had already looked on the porting team website and found one, I thought that a more reliable way would have been through Steam. Thank you for clarifying this issue, it is something I hand't comprehended fully
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Old 11-24-2011, 05:28 PM   #10
chronicpirate
 
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but aside from valve games the only games that are "osx compatible" on steam are coded in openGL and/or SDL... Or have the option to run in either directx or openGL. In order to get an "official" well made port you would need to totally rewrite the game in openGL( this is what valve had to do for hl2/tf2 etc. because directx is proprietary and no official version exists for osx or linux/bsd so you can't run dx games on them natively)I'm not sure what this "unofficial port" you're talking about is but I really doubt they rewrote the game. I would bet that all they do is hide some wine-esque(if not wine itself) program that provides a partial virtual windows environment for you to run the game in. In either case it will have a significant performance reduction. It would be best for you to boot camp up a windows install and boot to that when you want to play.. Plus this "unofficial version" is obviously a pirated version seeing as Bethesda didn't make it and you can't legally buy it anywhere so I really don't think you should discuss it further. Go find a osx based pirate board if you want help...
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Old 11-25-2011, 12:39 PM   #11
Crag
 
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Talking Playing Skyrim on Mac

First, a brief response to the snarky types who think they are sharp for disparaging Mac users. We have invested in high-quality, high-functionality, high-design machines from the company that sold some of the first PCs that you didn't have to solder together yourself (Apple II) and has continued, despite various ups and downs, to innovate like no other company in the world and to be copied after the fact by every other manufacturer of 'puters, pads and phones.

That Macs are not primarily gaming computers is hardly news to anyone. But then there is everything else we do with computers, and Macs basically beat the pants off every other brand at that.

It's only natural that we Mac owners prefer to play games in Mac-native format whenever possible. We aren't whining about it, we're just naturally interested. Game playing is the only use I have for a Windows PC. For all other purposes, Apple devices rule.

Portal 2 is a lovely example of a fun and popular game that was made to function in both Mac and Windows OS. It plays great on my 27" iMac in full-screen mode.

The same goes for Skyrim. When I bought my latest Mac in June 2011, it was with the intention of partitioning a couple hundred gigabytes of the internal hard disk with Apple's Boot Camp in order to play a few games I was interested in that are available in Windows, but not Mac, versions. I installed Windows 7 home premium 64 bit operating system. That license is an added expense, of course, but that money won't be much company for me when I'm dead and buried, so I might as well enjoy using it now. And doing this is a lot less expensive than purchasing a PS3 or, god forbid, an Xbox 360.

So, to the main thought in the post that started this thread. My suggestion to all who own a modern Mac and want to play Windows games is to buy a license for 64-bit Windows 7 and install it on a boot-camp partition. It isn't hard, it works well and the whole process takes less than an hour. Your actual labor will only be around 5 minutes. Most of the time is taken up by Windows installing itself.

Having done that, you can install Steam and whatever other Windows programs you wish in boot camp and boot into Windows or Mac OS X as and when you like. You'll probably want to install Steam on Mac OS as well.

When I first started Skyrim, it detected my hardware and set everything to high quality. I have not seen any reason to change this. The game looks and plays like a wonder in full-screen mode at 2560 x 1440 resolution, which is the native resolution of the 27" iMac. I played WoW for about six years and have been getting really tired of it. Skyrim has replaced World of Warcraft for me--it's so beautiful, so engaging, so fun! 24" screens seem so small to me these days.

You'll need to set up games you play based on the resources of the particular Mac you are playing on. I think Boot Camp is a better choice than either of the methods available for running Windows 7 under Mac OS X. Windows in Boot Camp runs at least as well as on a dedicated PC (Actually, that is what you are doing.).

Running Windows under Mac OS X makes it unnecessary to reboot when you want to do something in Windows, but Windows will be slower due, as I understand it, to the layer of emulation software and the processor overhead entailed in running two operating systems simultaneously.

My Mac has a 3.1 GHz Intel core i5 cpu, 12 GB 1333 MHz DDR3 RAM and an AMD RAdeon HD6970M 2048 MB gpu. It rocks big time. When I started pricing parts for a self-built Windows gaming rig this last spring, it quickly became more expensive than this iMac, and that was with a much smaller screen. Basically, I have a superior (for now, anyway) machine with a huge, lovely screen, OS X Lion and everything else that Apple is so good at for thousands of crowns less (I live in Sweden) than the closest thing I could build myself.

I reckon the mobile version of the 6970 that's used in the iMac is somewhat despecced compared to the nonmobile version. That's to be expected. I made a point of getting it with 2 GB of DDR5 memory instead of the standard 1 GB. I figure that the greatest bottleneck for the next few years will be memory, not processing power.

Besides everything else, this machine has one other great advantage over every stationary Windows PC I've ever encountered. It's extremely quiet. I have to listen carefully with my ear right up to the chassis in order to hear the fan noise. At normal viewing distance from the screen, it's dead silent. That silence is heavenly under all circumstances, whether I'm doing useful work (I'm a translator/proofreader), listening to music (via iTunes, of course), playing games or whatever.

To summarize: Boot Camp is free with Mac OS X. If you want to play a game that works in Windows, but not in OS X, make use of Boot Camp, install Windows 7, install your game, have fun and don't look back.
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Old 11-25-2011, 12:45 PM   #12
EChondo
 
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Originally Posted by Crag View Post
-snip-

To summarize: Boot Camp is free with Mac OS X. If you want to play a game that works in Windows, but not in OS X, make use of Boot Camp, install Windows 7, install your game, have fun and don't look back.
Windows=Gaming

Mac=Everything Else

There I summarized even further.
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Old 11-25-2011, 12:47 PM   #13
Crag
 
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Not bad!
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Old 11-25-2011, 01:03 PM   #14
Pete the Geek
 
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I'm a PC gamer and build my own rigs, however I travel for work and bring a MacBook Pro. Yes, it's a Mac, but it has surprisingly good specs. I put Steam on it and can play the few dual-OS games offered (e.g. Portal). The question about Mac gaming isn't about expecting to play games on it, it is more "what is possible" when I'm stuck waiting at an airport for a few hours.

I appreciated the information Craig posted about installing Windows 7 64-bit.
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Old 11-25-2011, 01:25 PM   #15
DanielCoffey
 
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The Porting Team have released an early Cider wrapper for Skyrim. It is not a pirate copy of the game at all - it is just a wrapper. You still need a legal installed copy of the game to play. Yes, I know some folks will get round that by pirating a copy to insert into the wrapper but the easiest thing to do is just buy it.

Either buy a retail boxed set, temporarily install it on a friend's windows machine and register it on Steam then move it into the wrapper, or, as I did initially, install and run the Steam for Windows client inside a wine skin wrapper and buy a digital copy of the game. You can then download your own digital copy and move that into the wrapper.

The only fly in the ointment was the recent change to the TESV.exe file which made it check in with Steam every time you play so you need to get a copy of TESV.exe prior to that change in order to play till a workaround is found.

Performance was, of course, a little lower than running it natively in Windows via Bootcamp but was still perfectly acceptable. Just be a little conservative with your performance expectations.
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