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Old 03-04-2012, 10:38 PM   #16
johnno
 
 
 
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Works with no issues on my new build.
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Old 03-04-2012, 10:48 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bodhisattvah View Post
...why would Steam continue to sell a broken game? (and I know they do because I just bought Warhead and Crysis 1 through Steam) Either fix it or dump it! I just bought this new. Yes, I can (and did!) make it work, but that's not how Steam is supposed to work.

I should not need to either run compatibility mode (Steam could include a link that does this by default) or have to resort to hunting down the 64-bit version myself. I tried both ways and yes, both solutions work.

Why was I forced to do this? It's unacceptable.
The games do work.

Considering the millions of possible PC configurations there will naturally be people much like yourself who have some issues.

Compatibility mode is probably the easiest fix a game could need and requires you to simply click a button. This mode exsists for situations just like yours.

I'ts unacceptable for you to expect Steam to be able to fix an issue that only a small % of the population has. If clicking a box was too much work I suggest taking up console gaming.

No PC game works 100% for everyone, this has most likely always been the case, so would you suggest that nobody sell PC games?
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Old 03-06-2012, 07:22 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bodhisattvah View Post
...why would Steam continue to sell a broken game? (and I know they do because I just bought Warhead and Crysis 1 through Steam) Either fix it or dump it! I just bought this new. Yes, I can (and did!) make it work, but that's not how Steam is supposed to work.

I should not need to either run compatibility mode (Steam could include a link that does this by default) or have to resort to hunting down the 64-bit version myself. I tried both ways and yes, both solutions work.

Why was I forced to do this? It's unacceptable.
Been working perfectly fine on my three different systems for the past 2 years without doing what you said it required. The 64 bit version is strictly optional. the 32 bit version works just fine and is just as fast. Just like gamers who want to extremely OC their systems, Steam can't be expected to support everything gamers want to do with their system.

And if you have problems with the version the being offered, you need to take it up with Crytek. They have been absent from Steam since Crysis2 was yank from Steam for breach of contract.
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:00 PM   #19
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I had some issues, but said work around (which didn't take 2 hours I might add) got it to work just fine. sorry you couldn't
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:55 AM   #20
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Same here. I bought Crysis a while ago hoping to play it when Ive finally bought a new computer. Now I have a computer and just installed Win7 64bit yesterday fully up to date. Crysis has never ran. It never leaves the black screen after opening. Always having to crash it to get out. Im thinking maybe its the graphics card/drivers? or maybe MS Visual C++ 2005 install that froze on install. But I had fully fixed that right after.

So seems like no one has found a fix for this problem.

Specs:
CPU - AMD FX -4100 Quad Core
Windows 7 premium 64 bit
Nvidia GeForce GTX 550 Ti
4 Gigs Ram
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:49 AM   #21
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I finally got around to start playing Crysis 2 after being in my game list for a long time. So far runs great.

Windows 7 premium 64 bit
AMD Athlon™ II X2 processor 3.0GHz
GeForce GT 520
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Last edited by DoubleD: 03-15-2012 at 08:54 AM.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:33 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by robcardiv View Post
I first installed my first sound blaster video card.
Er...

So anyway, whenever you're done being banned (if ever) please give us more details so that we can assist. Crysis has worked on 3 PCs and 3 OSes and the community will do all we can to make sure it works for you as well, but we'll need more detail.
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Old 03-30-2012, 05:01 PM   #23
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The only problem I had was the second to lass boss fight. Game kept crashing on me but I read its a common problem. I manage to get through it. Felt like I was a tester, trying to get out of the loop hole.
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Old 03-30-2012, 11:40 PM   #24
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I finished Crysis on my 64bit windows 7 gaming rig. Had to drop it into DX9 at the end to stop the DX10 crashes.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:33 AM   #25
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No Problems here...

I don't have the patience to build my own system, although I've done it in the past...nowadays, with sli setups and heat/cooling issues that work best with more complex liquid cooling solutions, I just feel better having an expertly built high end system.

I got a monster Alienware Aurora R.3 - 64 bit WIN 7 and it runs Crysis in all it's full glory, all graphics maxed out, running at a consistent 70 FPS.

So I wouldn't blame Crytek, that's simply the price you pay for being a PC gamer, there are so many configurations possible in PC hardware and so much variation with 3rd party software, drivers etc... that it's impossible for any developer to test their software on all possible platform configurations and conditions...a DEV like Crytek would have tested the code on a host of commercial-style systems, across different price/tech ranges and certainly have released recent patches dealing with Win 7, 64 bit issues, even for an older game like Crysis... so you're most likely having a serious problem because your system is home built and something in your build/software setup isn't playing nice with the game code.

That's the pitfall of building yourself, you really have no one to turn to when things don't go as they should. If Crysis 2 came out and it didn't work on a standard Alienware Win7, 64-bit build, do you think Dell could ignore that problem? NO WAY!! There would be a fix from Alienware or Crytek addressing the issue within a couple of weeks, a purpose built commercial gaming rig can't afford to have widespread compatibility issues with popular games so anytime I've had a problem running something with past Alienware systems, I just make a call and things get resolved pretty quickly - that's been my experience.

Well..enough of my windbagging - best of luck.

Last edited by BLooDH87: 04-05-2012 at 11:35 AM.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:23 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLooDH87 View Post
that's simply the price you pay for being a PC gamer, there are so many configurations possible in PC hardware and so much variation with 3rd party software, drivers etc... that it's impossible for any developer to test their software on all possible platform configurations and conditions...
That's ridiculous (no offence) basically a programmer has to make sure it works on direct X (or Open GL. After that videocard manufacturers have to make sure their drivers work with their videocards to play direct x (or open Gl) smoothly.
It's just I heard this argument over and over on these forums and it really doesn't make that much sense. The whole point of Direct X (or Open GL) is to provide a standard platform so programmers can make software that is compatible for windows based systems.
There might be reason to have a program work in visual basic as well, it might be programed in C++, C+, etc. But the thought that every combination of hardware requires something different out of the game developer would completely negate the use of programs such as direct X etc.
I'm not saying real world problems don't occur but usually it's because someone messed up somewhere. Saying (basically) that if you've manufactured your own computer you shouldn't really expect things to run smoothly is ridiculous.
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Old 04-06-2012, 04:49 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by yeeyoh View Post
I'm not saying real world problems don't occur but usually it's because someone messed up somewhere. Saying (basically) that if you've manufactured your own computer you shouldn't really expect things to run smoothly is ridiculous.
Actually, yeah. If you built your own computer, then by now you should not really expect things to always work as smooth as silk.

The closer you get to the cutting edge, the greater the likelyhood that somebody messed up somewhere. Which means that it is morely likely that multiple components were messed up somewhere. Which means that you are more likely to run into issues. This is a hit or miss situation, and certain combinations work better with certain games than others.

With new Operating Systems (Win7) it takes time for developers to learn the minute differences in the APIs, and the new quirks of the software. Some minor little change could cause a once stable game to become unstable. Generally, once Windows gets a service pack or two under its belt, most developers have gained enough experience developing for the platform.

New GPUs have new drivers. These drivers are not 100% polished at the first few releases, and there are often many changes in the architecture of the GPU that change how games perform.

Each version of DirectX has its own quirks and nuances that developers have to compensate for.

Finally, this last generation is such a radical departure from the previous generation that issues are bound to occur.

Windows 7 is a huge change from Windows XP. Sound drivers were deprecated in favor of software sound. The GUI now handles 3D and compositing. DirectX 11 was introduced, and is less compatible with previous versions of DirectX than 7-9 were. The OS and drivers are now working with 64-bit standards, multi-core PCs, GPUs with programmable shaders. Not to mention the looming death of IPv4 addresses which would likely kill most legacy internet multiplayer games. And these are just the obvious game related ones, there were plenty of other changes under the hood to the APIs, and the way the OS actually functions.
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Old 04-06-2012, 05:19 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Monster_user View Post
The closer you get to the cutting edge, the greater the likelyhood that somebody messed up somewhere. Which means that it is morely likely that multiple components were messed up somewhere. Which means that you are more likely to run into issues. This is a hit or miss situation, and certain combinations work better with certain games than others.
Do you have any real world evidence to back this up. I mean seriously, "the closer you get to cutting edge the greater the likelyhood that somebody messed up somewhere," what !?
I've had 2 systems under windows 7 so far, and everything has been going pretty smoothly. Windows 7 is already on sp1.
Most troubles I've seen on forums lately have to do with direct X 11, or crossfire/SLI installs with very little to do with whether a system is home built or prebuilt. If anything most prebuilt systems have a worst reputation.
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Old 04-07-2012, 11:11 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by yeeyoh View Post
Do you have any real world evidence to back this up. I mean seriously, "the closer you get to cutting edge the greater the likelyhood that somebody messed up somewhere," what !?
You've seen troubles with DirectX 11, and crossfire installs. Why do you need more proof than that of an unpredictable problem?

That is the nature of computing. You can only beta test for so long, and ensure so much stability and compatibility. The development of which is always an ongoing issue. This is why you have software updates to operating systems, graphics cards, and even processors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeeyoh View Post
with very little to do with whether a system is home built or prebuilt.
I was not saying that the problems had anything to do with buying prebuilt, or building it yourself. Merely that an individual that builds their own PC should be aware that the PC they build may not meet their needs.

Between the lack of awareness of quirks of newer technology, and developer bias towards certain vendors, the PC may not perform as expected, or as well as it would running a different game.

Crysis 1 was from a different era. 32-bit, Windows XP, DirectX 9, Geforce 8 series GPUs, Radeon HD 4000 series etc. The massive changes that Vista brought to the market could not be properly tested before the release of Crysis 1, and so Windows 7 could not be properly tested. Not to mention the early driver releases for newer hardware (Geforce 680?).

There is a process referred to as "ironing out the kinks", or "working the bugs out", which is often performed by "early adopters".
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Old 04-07-2012, 11:55 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Monster_user View Post
Actually, yeah. If you built your own computer, then by now you should not really expect things to always work as smooth as silk.
and then you say "I was not saying that the problems had anything to do with buying prebuilt, or building it yourself. Merely that an individual that builds their own PC should be aware that the PC they build may not meet their needs."
So hey I don't know what your talking about or why your quoting me. I was only commenting to someone else saying that a prebuilt system could be expected to play things smoothly where a home built system might not be able to meet such expectations.
And I still say prebuilt systems seem to have more problems in the forums and what not. Feel free to disagree but try not to contradict yourself.
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