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Old 05-01-2012, 06:12 PM   #1
enez67
 
 
 
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Ivy 3570k

I've seen lots of people say it's not worth upgrading to the 3570k.

Here, is my question.

Since this is my first build I plan on doing would getting it be worth it?
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:14 PM   #2
majebudsmog
 
 
 
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i52500k
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:17 PM   #3
enez67
 
 
 
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Originally Posted by majebudsmog View Post
i52500k
What if Im also going to use a Gtx 680? Using Ivy for the PCI 3.0 support
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:19 PM   #4
sfade
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enez67 View Post
I've seen lots of people say it's not worth upgrading to the 3570k.

Here, is my question.

Since this is my first build I plan on doing would getting it be worth it?
It all depends on what you are upgrading from. For example, upgrading from something like an i5 2500k would be, well, pointless really. However, if you are coming from something like a dual core E8400 the difference would be tremendous.

If you are building completely from scratch, new mobo, cpu, ram etc. Then there is no reason not to (with the exception being if you plan to push an overclock, they suffer from some heat issues). The difference between the two at stock speeds is very minimal, so that's probably why you hear about the lack of worth in an upgrade from the previous gen. The only concern right now is that many retail prices for the Ivy Bridge chips are too inflated (there are some selling them reasonable though).

PCIe 3.0 doesn't make any difference, it was released as a standard for future triple and quad SLI/Crossfire configurations. Single and dual GPU come nowhere near saturating PCIe 2.0

Last edited by sfade: 05-01-2012 at 06:23 PM.
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:22 PM   #5
enez67
 
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfade View Post
It all depends on what you are upgrading from. For example, upgrading from something like an i5 2500k would be, well, pointless really. However, if you are coming from something like a dual core E8400 the difference would be tremendous.

If you are building completely from scratch, new mobo, cpu, ram etc. Then there is no reason not to (with the exception being if you plan to push an overclock, they suffer from some heat issues). The difference between the two at stocks speeds is very minimal, so that's probably why you hear about the lack of worth in an upgrade from the previous gen.
Yeah, building from scratch.

And about the heat issue, I got that covered. Going to use an NH-D14 on it. A friend somehow got 2 of them when he ordered for one , so he is giving one to me
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:28 PM   #6
sfade
 
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Yeah, at stock speeds it's not really a concern, they aren't bad chips (about the same performance wise really, marginal difference). For overclocking the IB chips hit the thermal barrier sooner than SB, and tend to need to go to water cooling earlier. Most seem to get to about 4.5 - 4.7Ghz stable with water, whereas I can typically get the i5 Sandy past that on just a good air cooler.

Still strong processors, just a real disappointment for those of us who OC.

Last edited by sfade: 05-01-2012 at 06:30 PM.
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