Go Back   Steam Users' Forums > Steam Discussions > Hardware and Operating Systems

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-20-2010, 06:07 AM   #1
WhiteCobra
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Reputation: 48
Posts: 273
CPU overclocking problem

I have a AMD 1090T Black edition. Now i can run the cpu at 4GHZ with a multiplier of 16 fine. But my motherboard will only then allow a memory ratio that yields 2000mhz or 1333mhz... My ram doesn't seem to be up to the task of 2000mhz (1600 stock).


Now in the BIOS i've set the ratio to x20 and FSB (fsb is probably a bit old school here and its called something different now) to 200. This will allow me to run my ram at stock speed...


But within windows coretemp and cpu-x shows that the cpu wont run past it's x16 multipler (Even with a stress test).


Anyone know why it refuses to use the extra ratio's enabled in bios? The bios shows 4Ghz
WhiteCobra is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 10:40 AM   #2
DHRammstein
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Reputation: 67
Posts: 417
The more you OC the Cpu, the less and less you can push the Memory. I would OC as far as you can without having to pull the memory back.

I never push my memory if I OC the Cpu, just try to get the best timings I can.

I would leave the memory at the stock 1600, or even 1333 if it will yield a better overclock. There's almost no difference, and often times the memory actually performs better at 1333 than 1600. If you want to test your memory bandwidth at each setting, simply open a cmd with Admin and run: winsat mem

Edit- You may need to disable Cool&Quiet. -for the OS to use your custom clock

Also I 'Strongly' recommend using AMD Overdrive. It's a great program, it can test stability for you, adjust voltages, clocks, etc etc. (Of course you may already be using it) I'm using it at the moment, and getting great results. Phenom II 965BE @ 4.16, memory at 1333 9-9-9-24 but it's not the best memory, if I had something really good I could hit tighter timings, but that's an example.
Memory OC- Very little gain, holds back Cpu OC
Cpu OC- Entire system benefits, plus tighter timings available for memory.
Gpu OC- icing on the cake

Last edited by DHRammstein: 10-20-2010 at 11:10 AM.
DHRammstein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 11:15 AM   #3
dunny774
 
Join Date: May 2009
Reputation: 33
Posts: 645
AOD for stability? Lol..It's pathetic.
dunny774 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 11:19 AM   #4
rotNdude
 
rotNdude's Avatar
 
Volunteer Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Reputation: 10549
Posts: 46,589
Since the memory controller for AMDs are on the die of the CPU, you need to play around with the HTT frequency. I don't have the time right now to do the math regarding the CPU multis you are playing with and why they work out.
rotNdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 11:19 AM   #5
DHRammstein
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Reputation: 67
Posts: 417
It's no Prime95, but after adjusting clocks/voltages you can get a quick peek of how things are, before the "real" test.

I don't always see the need to state the obvious, which would be a list of things, including Prime95.
DHRammstein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 05:14 PM   #6
grndragon57
 
Guest
Posts: n/a
Your problem with Multiplier overclock not showing in Windows is probably because you have Cool'n'Quiet enabled in your BIOS. In your BIOS set Cool'n'Quiet. On some motherboards there is also a setting for C1E disable that also.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 05:21 PM   #7
madpistol
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Reputation: 923
Posts: 4,124
grndragon57 may be right on this one. It sounds like something is reducing the multiplier of the CPU inside windows. Cool'n'Quiet is a bios option, but there has to be a certain state that triggers that feature, and usually the OS dictates that, either directly or indirectly via the BIOS.

As far as getting the maximum performance, out of that system, you really should consider lowering your multiplier and upping the FSB a few ticks. The FSB frequency (w/ multiplier) is usually very happy around 2600mhz+ when the CPU is at 4Ghz. The stock 2000mhz restricts data flow, especially if the CPU is at 4Ghz. You'll see a huge difference in both benchmarks and "snap" in the system if you play around with that.
madpistol is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   Steam Users' Forums > Steam Discussions > Hardware and Operating Systems


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Site Content Copyright Valve Corporation 1998-2014, All Rights Reserved.