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Old 12-24-2010, 01:26 PM   #1
Emon
 
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What's with the camera?

Is there a reason that, when running, the camera becomes completely useless? It seems to discourage running and encourage me to take 5 hours to walk 20 feet. Am I missing something with this?
 
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Old 12-24-2010, 09:17 PM   #2
MarkG
 
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Originally Posted by Emon View Post
Is there a reason that, when running, the camera becomes completely useless? It seems to discourage running and encourage me to take 5 hours to walk 20 feet.
I presume that is the reason .
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Old 12-25-2010, 04:45 AM   #3
tacc
 
 
 
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Of course it's intended. Otherwise nothing would stop you from permanentely running. It'a also used to get you even more lost if I remember right.
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:42 AM   #4
MichaelSamyn
 
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We designed it like that, not so much to prevent you from running but to make you feel worried. As the camera moves away from the girl, we imagine you get worried about her since you're not close enough anymore to help and protect here. And since you don't see what's ahead of her, we imagine you worry even more, about what she could be running into.

In an early version of the game, the screen went completely black too. But that was too confusing.
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Old 01-02-2011, 10:18 PM   #5
Sanmei
 
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Hrm. That may have been your intent, but I have to question using counterintuitive and frustrating gameplay elements as a form of pathos. Would you develop empathy for your character if someone repeatedly turned off the computer monitor whenever you were in the midst of a delicate operation?

Particularly after the game has been completed at least once -- then the chief purpose is to hunt down items one may have missed, and this element makes that task unnecessarily tedious. I'm given to the opinion that tedium is the antithesis of any game, artistic or otherwise.
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:13 AM   #6
Amander
 
 
 
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I took that as a metaphor for real running in the forrest. You know, when you run, you don't look at your environment alot. And when you look closely oon what's going on around you, you don't run. I think, Tell of Tales did a good job with immersion in The Path and not seeing much while running is a part of it.
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Old 01-09-2011, 01:14 PM   #7
Sanmei
 
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I would disagree. Few things ruin immersion (for me) like constant reminders that I'm playing a game. When I run, I don't tilt my head backward until I'm staring blindly at the sky, unable to see a thing in front of me (that's a good way to discover that the phrase "missing the forest for the trees" has more than one meaning).

That's something that has only happened in a video game, and so I crash back down to reality, let up on the shift key (besides, my pinky hurts), wait for the camera to settle... then run again for a few seconds... then stop, wait for it to settle... repeat ad nausum. If it feels unnatural and frustrating, then it's probably not immersive.

To have running bring about immersiveness via camera interaction, I would have the game go into first person perspective when running, thus narrowing your field of vision to what you can see directly in front of you and nothing else. Add a realistic headbob and suppress the map appearance and the impression of running causing you to get increasingly lost is maintained while not becoming as frustrating of a mechanic.

That would, I think, satisfy both the gameplay needs of players and the art needs for those of us who desire that. It's always better to find a happy medium between accepted gameplay trends and artistic ambitions, even when the idea is (as with the Karoshi games) to subvert those trends. Being a developer means having both a vision for your project and an understanding of your audience.

Unfortunately, until the greater media and our authority figures understand that video games can be art, that leaves the gamers to do deconstruction and analysis of artistic games, and so one must expect a leaning toward those traditional gameplay elements and mechanics...
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Old 07-16-2011, 04:21 PM   #8
-=MagNum=-
 
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The camera made it more isolating for me, it puts you further away from the girl. So you are more alone is the woods. Creepy. But still fantastic.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:06 AM   #9
Annabubbles
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanmei View Post
I would disagree. Few things ruin immersion (for me) like constant reminders that I'm playing a game...
I agree with this post. Being aware of the shift key definitely placed a dent on the overall experience. (Though, still very enjoyable otherwise!)

Additionally, I felt that the ability to sprint inside a deep forest was worrying enough. The act of sprinting furthers the girl from everything familiar. I didn't think it was necessary to obscure the user's vision with trees to highlight this fact.

The narrow point of view idea would have been really interesting!

Last edited by Annabubbles: 11-28-2011 at 12:47 PM.
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