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Old 06-24-2013, 09:01 PM   #1
Millor
 
 
 
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BenQ XL2420T vs ASUS VG248QE

My monitor just died, and I've decided it probably isn't worth fixing and right now I'm using some old like 14 inch monitor I had, it's horrifying.

I've heard great things about the two monitors in the title and I'm wondering if there are any users of these monitors that might throw their opinions in. I live in the US so the ASUS is about $53 cheaper right now, but I've heard that the BenQ is a lot better for nVidia users, which I am. I'm leaning towards the BenQ, thinking that it might be better, but I'm not entirely sure and I'm not sure if it would even be enough to warrant that extra $53
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Old 06-25-2013, 07:51 AM   #2
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So I just did some reading on both monitors and a lot of reviews seem to say the same thing about both monitors: They're not worth the amount of money they sell for and get fairly average reviews even more so for 24inches.

I'd recommend getting something a tiny bit more expensive but a significant jump in both reviews and screen size:

http://www.amazon.com/Acer-HN274H-BM.../dp/B004YCMEJU
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:29 AM   #3
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PrivateBurke:

Do you have links for the reviews you refer to? Am in the market also.
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Old 06-26-2013, 10:44 AM   #4
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ASUS is good, and they have good warranty.

If you want to find reviews, just online search "model# + review"
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Old 06-26-2013, 12:09 PM   #5
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the benq is amazing for it's 120hz capability. couldn't tell you about any other 120hz monitors, as this is the first one i've owned.

i'm assuming you're purchasing one of these for their refresh rates? make sure you can run a constant 100+ fps!
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Old 06-26-2013, 01:02 PM   #6
Grunt7684
 
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millor View Post
My monitor just died, and I've decided it probably isn't worth fixing and right now I'm using some old like 14 inch monitor I had, it's horrifying.

I've heard great things about the two monitors in the title and I'm wondering if there are any users of these monitors that might throw their opinions in. I live in the US so the ASUS is about $53 cheaper right now, but I've heard that the BenQ is a lot better for nVidia users, which I am. I'm leaning towards the BenQ, thinking that it might be better, but I'm not entirely sure and I'm not sure if it would even be enough to warrant that extra $53
The BenQ is vastly superior to the ASUS and other 120hz monitors. It seems most of these monitors double up the pixels when responding to a 120hz signal. I guess it saves them money or something?

I participated to a discussion sometime ago regarding "most" 3D (120hz) monitors, and although the exact models you speak of aren't in the discussion, it shows what to look for. It gets pretty technical, and regards 3D Vision, which you may or may not be interested in, but please keep in mind that 3D Vision is just an APPLICATION of the 120hz refresh rate. In other words, it doesn't matter if you want 3D or not on your 120hz panel, these tests are valid anyway, and attest to the quality (or lack of) of the monitor itself, even when displaying 2D, 120hz images. Here: https://forums.geforce.com/default/t...-our-choice-/5

I want, in particular, to bring your eyes to these two images, made with .jps (stereo jpg's, which force the monitor to display two different images at a 1/120th of a second interval, effectively 120hz):

With an ASUS VG278H: http://img571.imageshack.us/img571/4810/120hztests.jpg

And

With an old Samsung 2233rz: http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/2...lmsamsungs.jpg

These are photos of the SAME image, displayed on two different monitors. One consistently displays an artifacted checkerboard pattern, while the other displays the image as it should appear. So be careful when buying a 120hz panel, they are not as competitive as they seem...

This is the .jps (rename it from .jpg to .jps to use it) and display it with a 3D photo viewer. Then take a number of pictures with a digital camera, to find out if your particular model has the defect. That's all I got: http://img194.imageshack.us/img194/9560/sterotest.jpg

Last edited by Grunt7684: 06-26-2013 at 01:19 PM.
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Old 06-26-2013, 01:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millor View Post
My monitor just died, and I've decided it probably isn't worth fixing and right now I'm using some old like 14 inch monitor I had, it's horrifying.

I've heard great things about the two monitors in the title and I'm wondering if there are any users of these monitors that might throw their opinions in. I live in the US so the ASUS is about $53 cheaper right now, but I've heard that the BenQ is a lot better for nVidia users, which I am. I'm leaning towards the BenQ, thinking that it might be better, but I'm not entirely sure and I'm not sure if it would even be enough to warrant that extra $53
How about the BenQ XL2411T?

As far as I understand, the only differences between it and the 2420T are it's inputs (still supports D-DVI), the stand, and the 2420T has a preset switch which allows you to switch between 3 monitor presets (how often would you (or anyone) use this feature)?

In the UK it's £90 cheaper, so should be $100 difference in the US at least.
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:39 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Semaphia View Post
How about the BenQ XL2411T?

As far as I understand, the only differences between it and the 2420T are it's inputs (still supports D-DVI), the stand, and the 2420T has a preset switch which allows you to switch between 3 monitor presets (how often would you (or anyone) use this feature)?

In the UK it's £90 cheaper, so should be $100 difference in the US at least.
Yep, as an owner of 2 120hz monitors, that is the one I would choose. Or the 23" Samsung S23A700D, which is what I am using, but isn't compatible with nVidia's 3D Vision.
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Old 06-27-2013, 08:45 AM   #9
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I owned the XL2420T for about a week and sent it back due to how bad the colors were even after I had calibrated it (ICC profile and Spyder pro). Everything just looked super washed out. Subjectively speaking, heck even the screen on my five year old laptop had FAR better colors. Can't say the same about the VG248QE as I've never owned it, but if you read through some of the reviews online there are many owners who complain about inaccurate or washed out colors no matter how much you calibrate it. Both monitors have next to no input lag so you will have the smoothest gaming experience granted you have the horse power to push upwards of 120FPS in a given game.

The VG248QE apparently uses the same panel as the newer XL2411T. Some of the official reviews like the one on PCMonitors.info complain about the VG248QE and XL2411T both having inconsistent colors even after calibration, so be warned.

TLDR - XL2420T, XL2411T, VG248QE offer the smoothest gaming experience granted your PC can pump out the high frame rates. Due to the particular panel (not talking about TN) used in these three monitors, the colors may or may not be a turnoff for some people. If you're watching movies or doing any type of photo work the colors will definitely be a problem.
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Old 06-27-2013, 10:50 AM   #10
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That VG248QE monitor may suffer from the fact that at a 144Hz refresh (7ms per frame) and a 1ms (G2G) response, that the pixels simply can't make the complete transition to their new color state before they are told to change color again. That's why I have always been a proponent for using the BWB spec for response time rather than G2G.
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Old 06-27-2013, 12:11 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NitrousX View Post
I owned the XL2420T for about a week and sent it back due to how bad the colors were even after I had calibrated it (ICC profile and Spyder pro). Everything just looked super washed out. Subjectively speaking, heck even the screen on my five year old laptop had FAR better colors. Can't say the same about the VG248QE as I've never owned it, but if you read through some of the reviews online there are many owners who complain about inaccurate or washed out colors no matter how much you calibrate it. Both monitors have next to no input lag so you will have the smoothest gaming experience granted you have the horse power to push upwards of 120FPS in a given game.

The VG248QE apparently uses the same panel as the newer XL2411T. Some of the official reviews like the one on PCMonitors.info complain about the VG248QE and XL2411T both having inconsistent colors even after calibration, so be warned.

TLDR - XL2420T, XL2411T, VG248QE offer the smoothest gaming experience granted your PC can pump out the high frame rates. Due to the particular panel (not talking about TN) used in these three monitors, the colors may or may not be a turnoff for some people. If you're watching movies or doing any type of photo work the colors will definitely be a problem.
Again on the 3D Vision forums, there has been a lot of talk about various monitor models providing a great - or not so great - experience. It seems that 120hz monitors have a high defect rate, but get shipped anyway as working monitors. They don't have dead pixels, but backlight bleed or uneven/washed out colors seem to happen often.

I know a guy who sent back his XL2420T (or was it the 27" model?) twice before accepting the third one, which was markedly better than the first 2. Of course, most of us really, REALLY *NEED* a monitor right NOW when we're buying one, so it comes as no surprise that this practice is unusual, which I guess allows some manufacturers to get away with shipping semi-defective product.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rotNdude View Post
That VG248QE monitor may suffer from the fact that at a 144Hz refresh (7ms per frame) and a 1ms (G2G) response, that the pixels simply can't make the complete transition to their new color state before they are told to change color again. That's why I have always been a proponent for using the BWB spec for response time rather than G2G.
That is a very valid point. In fact, most 120hz monitors achieve their high response rate by sending a different color signal to the pixels, than the actual color being displayed. That is, the monitor takes into account the fact that the pixel will NOT have time to switch completely to the color represented by the signal sent to it, not in time for the next frame, and so, sends an "excessive" signal which it estimates will allow the pixel to switch to the right color by the time of the next frame.

In other words, 120hz or 144hz panels are in perpetual "overshoot" mode, where the signal is an overshoot of the color being displayed, due to the LCD not being able to switch even fast enough. But the technology has become pretty good, and on monitors like my Samsung S23A700D, the effect is pretty good. However, using the stereoscopic (left eye black, right eye white) test image I provided above, even my sammy displays a purple tinge on what should theoretically appear a pure 50% grey. So yes, there is a lot of room for improvement on this tech.
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Old 06-27-2013, 01:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunt7684 View Post
Again on the 3D Vision forums, there has been a lot of talk about various monitor models providing a great - or not so great - experience. It seems that 120hz monitors have a high defect rate, but get shipped anyway as working monitors. They don't have dead pixels, but backlight bleed or uneven/washed out colors seem to happen often.

I know a guy who sent back his XL2420T (or was it the 27" model?) twice before accepting the third one, which was markedly better than the first 2. Of course, most of us really, REALLY *NEED* a monitor right NOW when we're buying one, so it comes as no surprise that this practice is unusual, which I guess allows some manufacturers to get away with shipping semi-defective product.


That is a very valid point. In fact, most 120hz monitors achieve their high response rate by sending a different color signal to the pixels, than the actual color being displayed. That is, the monitor takes into account the fact that the pixel will NOT have time to switch completely to the color represented by the signal sent to it, not in time for the next frame, and so, sends an "excessive" signal which it estimates will allow the pixel to switch to the right color by the time of the next frame.

In other words, 120hz or 144hz panels are in perpetual "overshoot" mode, where the signal is an overshoot of the color being displayed, due to the LCD not being able to switch even fast enough. But the technology has become pretty good, and on monitors like my Samsung S23A700D, the effect is pretty good. However, using the stereoscopic (left eye black, right eye white) test image I provided above, even my sammy displays a purple tinge on what should theoretically appear a pure 50% grey. So yes, there is a lot of room for improvement on this tech.
You are probably right. I went through one BenQ XL2420T (sent back for washed out colors) and four Viewsonic V3D245 (sent back for backlit uniformity) before setting upon the Planar SA2311w which I'm currently using now. The Planar is one of the best TN panels I've ever used in terms of color and screen uniformity.
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Old 06-28-2013, 08:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunt7684 View Post
In other words, 120hz or 144hz panels are in perpetual "overshoot" mode, where the signal is an overshoot of the color being displayed, due to the LCD not being able to switch even fast enough. But the technology has become pretty good, and on monitors like my Samsung S23A700D, the effect is pretty good. However, using the stereoscopic (left eye black, right eye white) test image I provided above, even my sammy displays a purple tinge on what should theoretically appear a pure 50% grey. So yes, there is a lot of room for improvement on this tech.
The good news is that the overshoots can be precisely timed to hit near its correct pixel value, especially when timed with a LightBoost strobe backlight, to flash at the correct precise moment in an LCD refresh.

The LightBoost strobe backlight is good for both 2D (eliminate motion blur) and 3D (eliminate crosstalk). The backlight is turned off while waiting for pixel transitions (unseen by human eyes), and the backlight is strobed only on fully-refreshed LCD frames (seen by human eyes). Most of the overdrive overshoots and ripples is kept in total darkness. The strobes can be shorter than pixel transitions, breaking the pixel transition speed barrier! In addition, it eliminates the sample-and-hold effect. This produces a CRT effect on a LCD with zero motion blur.

There's a small amount of overdrive left, but 99% of overdrive is gone in LightBoost mode, on the ASUS VG248QE. You can also reduce the purple tinging in Samsung S23A700D version of the 3D mode by changing the "Response Time" to "Normal" before switching to 3D mode. But it is not perfect. The newer panels such as VG248QE finish pixel transitions more completely. Although the S23A700D has much better colors than the VG248QE, there is near-zero overdrive on VG248QE when LightBoost is enabled. So the panels have finally been able to finish >99% of pixel transitions.

The checkerboard pixel pattern on the VG278H is compensated by VG278H having less motion blur (due to LightBoost) than the old 2233rz. During fast video games, there is about 6 times less motion blur on the VG278H than the 2233rz (if LightBoost is enabled), which can greatly compensate, if you like high-framerate 120Hz gaming.

See High Speed Video of LightBoost.

Article: BlurBusters: 60Hz vs 120Hz vs LightBoost
Article: TFTCentral: Motion Blur Reduction Backlights Including LightBoost
Questions: LightBoost FAQ

You can turn on LightBoost using the new ToastyX Strobelight Utility. (Easy ON/OFF via a hotkey).

Supported Monitors: ASUS VG248QE, BENQ XL2411T, ASUS VG278H, ASUS VG278HE, BENQ XL2420T, BENQ XL2420TX, BENQ XL2720T, AOC g2460Pqu, Acer HN274HBbmiiid

Last edited by mdrejhon: 06-28-2013 at 08:44 PM.
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Old 06-29-2013, 02:19 PM   #14
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My opinions on XL2420T / Lightboost

First of all I'm a long time CRT User.

I play CS 1.6 and CS GO.


I got a XL2420T because of the 120hz capability, low input lag when "Instant Mode" is turned on, and lightboost capability in 2d.

First of all.. Lightboost.. It works, it looks great. Problem I found is that there is much too much input lag when it is enabled.. the issue is because "Instant Mode" is disabled with Lightboost, and you are not able to turn it on. So it looked good, but was completely unplayable for me.

So, what about with Lightboost off. Just running like it was meant to be with Instant Mode and 120hz. Huge Improvement. This is how I run it.

However, is it as good as CRT? No. It still feels maybe a tiny bit delayed/input lag. Or maybe it is because of the ghosting. Either way, XL2420T definitely loses out to CRT.

Conclusion, Lightboost isn't good at all if you are a FPS player.
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Old 06-29-2013, 02:21 PM   #15
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By the way I enabled Lightboost through the recommended method that was supposed to be best for input lag etc. Still wasn't good enough.

In both regular/Lightboost modes the video quality is great, especially at 1080p.

The colors are obviously not as good as CRT. But it's to be expected. Not a problem for me at all. I read a lot of reviews of people criticizing the color reproduction, maybe I'm just not that picky.

Last edited by sixece: 06-29-2013 at 02:25 PM.
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